Tacx Galaxia

Tacx Galaxia

Tacx has come up with a revolutionary new roller called the Tacx Galaxia. These rollers try to mimic natural forces on a bicycle by moving with the rider. The problem with traditional rollers is that riders have to concentrate all the time and try not to fall off when standing, especially as the bike begins to sway. The Galaxia moves forward when riders accelerate due to the generated kinetic energy. The opposite happens when slowing down and the roller moves backwards. This invention is so unique, so much so that Tacx has patented the system.

First impressions make one think that the Galaxia looks unstable when seeing the swing system at work, but the opposite is true on the bike. This system actually enables riders to more easily stand on the bike while on the roller.

Michael Morkov

Michael Morkov

Michael Morkov is a pro cyclist currently with Team Saxo Bank. In Poland in 2009 he became the Madison World Track Champion along with Alex Rasmussen. In 2010 and 2011 he raced in the Giro d’Italia and in 2011 he finished 18th in the road world championships in his home country, Denmark. He was one of the first pro riders to try the Galaxia and was very positive from the start.

Morkov says “Riding on the Galaxia feels better than riding on other rollers, it definitely feels more smooth.” About standing he says, “When you jump on the rollers, it’s a little bit unstable at the beginning, because you have to find your equilibrium. But once riding on the rollers, you experience a much better balance.” He likes the trainers so much and has already bought two of them.

Before the Galaxia Morkov used the Tacx Antares as his warm-up and training roller, and says “I am still very happy with them, but it’s a good thing that now we can also use the Galaxia. These are the rollers of the future.” Rollers are a mobile training center for professional cyclists and are easy to use anywhere.

Before races rollers are often used for warm-up sessions by professionals. The sessions vary in length but generally range in length from 20 to 40 minutes. The aim is to start slowly and to build up intensity with intervals to raise the heart rate and warm-up the muscles without any injury. Cadence is also important to get the right feeling of racing in the legs.